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Open Source POS

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This past weekend People's Food Co-op in SE Portland made history. During a conference with tech and IT folk from co-ops around the country these uber-geeks assembled and successfully rang out items on the world's first entirely free, open-source point-of

Open Source POS

  1. Open-source POS system
    This past weekend People's Food Co-op in SE Portland made history. During a conference with tech and IT folk from co-ops around the country these uber-geeks assembled and successfully rang out items on the world's first entirely free, open-source point-of-sale system. A point-of-sale system (or POS) is the software needed to run a cash register and manage the pricing of all the items in a store. It all started several years ago when Tak Tang, the Technology Coordinator at The Wedge Co-op in Minneapolis, MN got frustrated at his stores POS system because of his inability to get the information out of it that would really be useful to the store. Like most proprietary software POS systems have a locked core that prevents anyone from copying the source code and also prevents anyone from getting inside to mine data that the software wasn't designed to spit out. 
       
  2. Open Source POS Project
    This project is to create an open-source Point of Sale (POS) system. While we are just starting this effort, I envision that it will build a set of tools that can be assembled and customized to address a variety of POS requirements. If we do our job right, VARs will select these tools as the basis of their solutions, and some of us may even go on to be VARs ourselves. In any case, getting VARs to select a Linux-based solution is the goal. What are the tools I am talking about? There is an amazing array here. On the geek end are drivers for barcode readers, touch screens, IR devices and such. On the business end there will need to be accounting software and reports. In each case we need to identify what is needed, design and build the tool and get it accepted by vendors outside the Linux community--be they hardware manufacturers or service providers such as credit card processors.

  3. Open Source Linux Based POS Systems
    I am currently working for a number of clients that have very similar needs for a cost-effective POS system that may be integrated online. (read : cheap if not free) These are all small business clients with small budgets and so I would like to suggest something Linux-based, with a nice GUI, and a database I can get at through the web (PostgreSQL would be great). I have searched for and read the past Slashdot articles on the subject only to find that they are old and out of date. I have also done numerous google searches only to find that there is not a clear leader. My clients don't really need things like payroll and purchasing but inventory control, accounting, and customer storage are important.
      
  4. Open Source Point of Sale Service Provider
    Flood hammer Media provides open source solutions to Inventory and Point of Sale. Save money on licensing and have more flexible software. Customize and optimize your inventory or point of sale software. Services Examples:
    For bookstores the software will perform ISBN bar-code lookups that can populate your database and your website automatically.
    Inventory software that is integrated into your accounting software
    Inventory software that is integrated into your suppliers catalog
    Networks designed around and servers based on open source software solutions and Linux operating systems
    We have a great relationship with Justin Systems who provides our clients with quality bar-code and point of sale hardware

      
  5. Open-source Point Of Sale system
    This past weekend People's Food Co-op in Portland, Cascadia made history. During a conference with tech and IT folk from co-ops around the united states these uber-geeks assembled and successfully rang out items on the world's first entirely free, open-source point-of-sale system. A point-of-sale system (or POS) is the software needed to run a cash register and manage the pricing of all the items in a store. It all started several years ago when Tak Tang, the Technology Coordinator at The Wedge Co-op in Minneapolis, MN got frustrated at his stores POS system because of his inability to get the information out of it that would really be useful to the store. Like most proprietary software POS systems have a locked core that prevents anyone from copying the source code and also prevents anyone from getting inside to mine data that the software wasn't designed to spit out. Not being able to get inside of the software means expensive service calls to vendors when something goes wrong. It also means having to wait to purchase the next version for new features and bug fixes.

       
  6. Business Software Point of Sale
    Advanced Software is pleased to announce the release of UA Business Software 2006?. This exciting new release represents a significant upgrade for existing UA Corporate Accounting, UA Business Software Professional, and UA Business Software Enterprise users, as well as Resellers, OEM integrators and potential customers. UA Business Software 2006? is designed specifically to meet the demanding IT and data requirements of modern businesses, and delivers the technologies that allow organizations to automate virtually any process, powerfully and affordably. The solution automates financial accounting, customer relations and supply chain management.

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Posted on: January 28, 2008

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