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strftime ()
Posted on: August 29, 2009 at 12:00 AM
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This following example of srftime() is used in formatting a local time or date according to locale setting.

PHP strftime() Function

The strftime() function formats a local time or date according to locale settings. Format the time and/or date according to locale settings. Month and weekday names and other language-dependent strings respect the current locale set with setlocale().

Not all conversion specifiers may be supported by your C library, in which case they will not be supported by PHP's strftime(). Additionally, not all platforms support negative timestamps, so your date range may be limited to no earlier than the Unix epoch. This means that %e, %T, %R and, %D (and possibly others) - as well as dates prior to Jan 1, 1970 - will not work on Windows, some Linux distributions, and a few other operating systems

Syntax of strftime() Function PHP

strftime(format,timestamp) 

format - Required. Specifies how to return the result:

%a  - An abbreviated textual representation of the day from Sun through Sat
%A - A full textual representation of the day like from Sunday through Saturday
%d - Two-digit day of the month (with leading zeros) 01 to 31
%e - Day of the month, with a space preceding single digits from 1 to 31
%j - Day of the year, 3 digits with leading zeros like from 001 to 366
%u ISO-8601 -  numeric representation of the day of the week 1 (for Monday) though 7 (for Sunday)
%w - Numeric representation of the day of the week 0 (for Sunday) through 6 (for Saturday)

Week --- ---

%U  - Week number of the given year, starting with the the first Sunday as the first week 13 (for the 13th full week of the year)
%V ISO-8601:1988 - week number of the given year, starting with the first week of the year with at least 4 weekdays, with Monday being the start of the week 01 through 53 (where 53 accounts for an overlapping week)
%W - A numeric representation of the week of the year, starting with the first Monday as the first week 46 (for the 46th week of the year beginning with a Monday)

Month --- ---

%b - Abbreviated month name, based on the locale from Jan through Dec
%B - Full month name, based on the locale like from January through December
%h Abbreviated month name, based on the locale (an alias of %b) from Jan through Dec
%m Two digit representation of the month from 01 (for January) through 12 (for December)

Year --- ---

%C Two digit representation of the century (year divided by 100, truncated to an integer) 19 for the 20th Century
%g Two digit representation of the year going by ISO-8601:1988 standards (see %V) Example: 09 for the week of January 6, 2009
%G The full four-digit version of %g Example: 2008 for the week of January 3, 2009
%y Two digit representation of the year Example: 09 for 2009, 79 for 1979
%Y Four digit representation for the year Example: 2038

Time --- ---

%H Two digit representation of the hour in 24-hour format 00 through 23
%I Two digit representation of the hour in 12-hour format 01 through 12
%l (lower-case 'L') Hour in 12-hour format, with a space preceeding single digits 1 through 12
%M Two digit representation of the minute 00 through 59
%p UPPER-CASE 'AM' or 'PM' based on the given time Example: AM for 00:31, PM for 22:23
%P lower-case 'am' or 'pm' based on the given time Example: am for 00:31, pm for 22:23
%r Same as "%I:%M:%S %p" Example: 09:34:17 PM for 21:34:17
%R Same as "%H:%M" Example: 00:35 for 12:35 AM, 16:44 for 4:44 PM
%S Two digit representation of the second 00 through 59
%T Same as "%H:%M:%S" Example: 21:34:17 for 09:34:17 PM
%X Preferred time representation based on locale, without the date Example: 03:59:16 or 15:59:16
%z Either the time zone offset from UTC or the abbreviation (depends on operating system) Example: -0500 or EST for Eastern Time
%Z The time zone offset/abbreviation option NOT given by %z (depends on operating system) Example: -0500 or EST for Eastern Time

Time and Date Stamps --- ---

%c Preferred date and time stamp based on local Example: Tue Feb 5 00:45:10 2009 for February 4, 2009 at 12:45:10 AM
%D Same as "%m/%d/%y" Example: 02/05/09 for February 5, 2009
%F Same as "%Y-%m-%d" (commonly used in database datestamps) Example: 2009-02-05 for February 5, 2009
%s Unix Epoch Time timestamp (same as the time() function) Example: 305815200 for September 10, 1979 08:40:00 AM
%x Preferred date representation based on locale, without the time Example: 02/05/09 for February 5, 2009

Miscellaneous --- ---

%n A newline character ("\n") ---
%t A Tab character ("\t") ---
%% A literal percentage character ("%") ---

Maximum length of this parameter is 1023 characters.

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Posted on: August 29, 2009

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